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Taliban Surge Poses Existential Crisis For Afghan Government: US Watchdog

On Thursday, a watchdog agency reported that after the United States struck a deal with insurgents in February 2020, the Taliban doubled the number of attacks and the Afghan government faces an “existential crisis.” Report
stated that Taliban attacks on Afghan targets increased from 6,700 in the three months ending in the Doha Agreement to 13,242 in September-November 2020. According to a report by the United States Special Inspector General for Reconstruction of Afghanistan (SIGAR), in the following three months, 4,444 attacks remained above 10,000.
Although the increase in attacks has long been obvious, there is no previous data to show how intense the rebel offensives have become.
The United States agreed to withdraw all troops from Afghanistan, waiting for the Taliban to negotiate a peace agreement with the Kabul government.
Since then, Taliban government negotiations have come to a standstill, but the United States has steadily withdrawn its troops. There are currently only a few hundred people. The deadline for a full withdrawal is August 31. The
SIGAR report clearly noted that the Doha Agreement did not promote the Taliban and Kabul negotiations, but launched an offensive that took the government by surprise and increased the number of civilian deaths. Report
cited data from the United States’ NATO Joint Forces in Afghanistan, saying that in January and March 2020, only 510 civilians were killed and 709 casualties. The number soared after 4,444, reaching 1,058 deaths and 1,959 injuries in the third quarter of that year, and continued to maintain high levels. SIGAR report
indicated that the latest data for April and May of this year showed that there were 705 civilian deaths and 1,330 casualties.
“The general trend is clearly not conducive to the Afghan government. If it is not resolved and reversed, the Afghan government may face an existential crisis,” said Inspector General John Sopko.
He said the report provides a thought-provoking picture that stands in stark contrast to the “general over-optimism” that is characteristic of US-led efforts to rebuild and strengthen Afghanistan and hundreds of billions of dollars spent by the United States government.
“The news from Afghanistan this quarter is disappointing,” says the report.
Faced with the new Taliban offensive, he said the Afghan government security forces “seemed surprised and caught off guard and are now in a state of retreat.” After the Taliban doubled down on their attacks after February 2020, the Afghan government faced a “survival crisis” on Thursday. A regulatory report indicated that the United States is dealing with insurgents. Report
stated that the Taliban’s attacks on targets Afghans increased from 6,700 in the three months ending in the Doha Agreement to 13,242 in September-November 2020. According to a report by the US Special Inspector General for Afghanistan’s Reconstruction (SIGAR), 4,444 attacks remained above 10,000 in the following three months. The increase in
attacks has long been witnessed, but until now there is no data showing how fierce the rebels are offensive.
The United States agreed to withdraw all troops from Afghanistan, expecting the Taliban to negotiate a peace agreement with the Kabul government.
Since then, negotiations with the Taliban government have reached a deadlock, but the United States has been withdrawing its troops steadily. There are currently only a few hundred people. The deadline for a complete withdrawal is August 31. The
SIGAR report clearly pointed out that the Doha Agreement did not promote negotiations between the Taliban and Kabul, but launched an offensive that caught the government by surprise and increased the number of civilian deaths. 4,444 According to the report citing data from NATO’s joint forces in Afghanistan, between January and March 2020, only 510 civilians were killed and 709 casualties. After
, the number increased, reaching 1,058 deaths and 1,959 injuries in the third quarter of that year, and continued to remain high.
According to the SIGAR report, the latest data in April and May this year showed that there were 705 civilian deaths and 1,330 casualties.

“The overall trend is obviously not good for the Afghan government. If it is not resolved and reversed, the Afghan government may face an existential crisis,” said Inspector General John Sopko.
He said that the report provided a thought-provoking picture that contrasted sharply with the “pervasive excessive optimism” which is characteristic of US-led efforts to rebuild and strengthen Afghanistan and hundreds of billions of dollars spent by the US government.

“The news from Afghanistan this quarter is serious,” the report said.
In the face of the new Taliban offensive, he said that the Afghan government security forces “seem to be surprised and caught off guard, and they are now opposing it.”
“What is particularly worrying is the speed and ease with which the Taliban apparently controls the northern provinces of Afghanistan, which were once bastions of anti-Taliban sentiment.”
“What is particularly worrying is that the Taliban apparently controls the northern provinces of Afghanistan. The speed and ease of the regions, these regions were once a bastion of anti-Taliban sentiment.”

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